National Geographic Phoenix ll Globe

1 review

National Geographic Phoenix ll Globe

National Geographic Phoenix ll Globe

SKU: NGORGMAPPHX

1 review

$210.00

Quantity:
-
+
Available, ready to ship.

This item ships to the USA.

Have Questions? Chat with us or Call 1-800-437-5521
Overview

For a globe that complements your contemporary, design-conscious decor, National Geographic's Phoenix II is the perfect choice. Rising dramatically above a sweeping black steel base, the Phoenix II light-colored executive color palette is at home in any setting. Steel yoke and full meridian. Features more than 4,000 place names and full raised topographic relief.
Not available for shipment outside of the U.S. and Canada. Expedited shipping is not available for this item.

Details

12" diameter globe. 16"W x 12"D x 24"H. © 2012

About Our Globes

National Geographic is proud to partner with U.S. manufacturer Replogle to create globes for home, office, and classroom. Each globe -- floor-standing, desktop, or illuminated -- has more than 4,000 place names, printed on durable press-craft, plastic-impregnated paper.


Started in the founder's basement more than 80 years ago at the height of the Depression, Replogle has grown to become the world's largest manufacturer of fine globes. National Geographic's award-winning cartography group was founded in 1915 and has helped shape our vision of the world through the art and science of mapmaking.


Each handsome globe comes with a certificate of authenticity.

Reviews

Customer Reviews

3 Based on 1 Reviews
5 ★
0% 
0
4 ★
0% 
0
3 ★
100% 
1
2 ★
0% 
0
1 ★
0% 
0
Write a Review Ask a Question
  • Reviews
  • Questions

Thank you for submitting a review!

Your input is very much appreciated. Share it with your friends so they can enjoy it too!

Filter Reviews:
NW
12/03/2012
Neil w.

Nice Appearance

Compared to the not-fancy National Geogrphic globe I bought in 1981, this one has somewhat less detail on about the same size globe. Lines of constant latitude don't meet very exactly where one piece of the globe map runs into an adjoining piece of the map. This one is made in China, and the old one was no doubt made in the US. The metal stand is of striking design and seems to have good finish, but long term I have concern for what happens if we carelessly let the single bolt the holds things together get loose enough to allow the globe to hit the floor. The tendency will be for people to try to pivot the joint containing the bolt, and over time that will loosen the bolt. Though the globe has faults, it may well be better than many others.