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YourAmigo:Books:Culture, History and Religion:Culture and Religion:Geography of Religion - Softcover
Geography of Religion - Softcover
Item # 55910C

   
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Overview

With the conflicts of the modern world gravitating toward concerns of the secular versus the sacred, no book could be more timely and vital than Geography of Religion—the definitive volume for understanding the historic and geographic backgrounds of the five major faiths of the world.


This comprehensive reference portrays the great religions of humankind through authoritative text and vivid photographs, each from its ancient roots to its role in modern life. Explore the landscapes and cultures where these faiths took hold and flourished and follow them as they spread around the world, survive conflict, and evolve.


Through the words of eminent scholars, learn what it means to be Hindu and bathe in the sacred Ganges, to be a Buddhist and revere a statue of the Enlightened One, to be Muslim and trek to Mecca, to be Christian and walk the stations of the cross in Jerusalem, or to be Jewish and pray at the Wailing Wall.


Geography of Religion is a graceful and masterful look at the faiths and beliefs that have inspired people both individually and politically and have shaped the timeline of human history from its very beginning.


Details

  • Softcover
  • Foreword by Archbishop Desmond Tutu and Rev. Mpho Tutu; Epilogue by His Holiness the Dalai Lama
  • 416 pages; 210 photographs, artifacts, and maps
  • 9 1/8'' 10 7/8''
  • © 2004

Press Quotes

"The 200 photographs demonstrating the diversity of architecture, people, and terrain, are stunning in their beauty and simplicity."—Publishers Weekly


"More than just an incredibly beautiful coffee-table book, The Geography of Religion is part history book, part travelogue, part theology text."—Bookpage


"With stunning images from National Geographic photographers and recognized experts serving as tour guides, this book delivers."—Indianapolis Star